New book: Contours of Privacy

I few years ago I presented a paper at the “Countours of Privacy: Social, Psychological and Normative Perspectives” conference in Ottawa, sponsored by Members of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada research group and their “On the Identity Trail: Understanding the Importance and Impact of Anonymity and Authentication in a Networked Society” research project.

I’m thrilled to announce that, after a peer review process and the hard work of David Matheson, a collection of papers from this conference has been published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing in an edited volume, “Contours of Privacy”. From the description:

The contours of privacy—its particular forms and our reasons for valuing it—are numerous and varied. This book explores privacy’s contours in a series of essays on such themes as the relationship between privacy and social accountability, privacy in and beyond anonymity, the psychology of privacy, and the privacy concerns of emerging information technologies.

The book’s international and multidisciplinary group of contributors provides rich insights about privacy that will be of great interest not only to the scholarly privacy community at large but also to professionals, academics, and laypersons who understand that the contours of privacy weave themselves throughout wide swaths of life in present-day society.

The stylistically accessible yet scholarly rigorous nature of The Contours of Privacy, along with the diversity of perspectives it offers, set it apart as one of the most important additions to the privacy literature on the contemporary scene.

I feel privileged to have an expanded version of my original paper included in this volume: “Privacy on the Roads: Mobility, Vehicle Safety Communication Technologies, and the Contextual Integrity of Personal Information Flows”.

The full table of contents is after the fold.

Introduction
Exploring the Contours of Privacy
David Matheson……………………………………………………………………………..vii

Part I: Privacy, Anonymity and Accountability

Chapter One
Scoping Anonymity in Cases of Compelled Disclosure of Identity:
Lessons from BMG v. Doe
Ian Kerr & Alex Cameron…………………………………………………………………3

Chapter Two
Xenophon and the City without Walls
J. Hugh Hunter……………………………………………………………………………….31

Part II: Privacy In and Beyond Anonymity

Chapter Three
Context and Construction: Connecting Privacy, Anonymity
and Identity
Marsha Hanen………………………………………………………………………………..51

Chapter Four
Anonymity and Privacy: Conceptual Links and Normative
Implications
Travis Dumsday……………………………………………………………………………..71

Chapter Five
Anonymity in 12-Step Groups: An Anthropological Approach
Catarina Frois………………………………………………………………………………..85

Part III: Privacy and the Mind

Chapter Six
Privacy as Commodity: Divulgence as Diversion
Aritha van Herk……………………………………………………………………………109

Chapter Seven
Privacy and Psychology
Stephen T. Margulis……………………………………………………………………..131

Chapter Eight
Privacy, Rights, and Moral Value
Steven Davis………………………………………………………………………………..153

Part IV: Privacy and Emerging Technologies

Chapter Nine
Data Protection versus Privacy: Lessons from Facebook’s Beacon
Valerie Steeves…………………………………………………………………………….183

Chapter Ten
Information Revelation and Privacy in Online Social Networks
Ralph Gross & Alessandro Acquisti………………………………………………..197

Chapter Eleven
Privacy on the Roads: Mobility, Vehicle Safety Communication
Technologies, and the Contextual Integrity of Personal Information Flows
Michael Zimmer…………………………………………………………………………..219

Chapter Twelve
Privacy Outside the Castle: Surveillance Technologies and Reasonable
Expectations of Privacy in Canadian Judicial Reasoning
Krista Boa……………………………………………………………………………………241

Contributors…………………………………………………………………………………263

Index…………………………………………………………………………………………..265

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