Posts Categorized / Professional

UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies Seeking Faculty in Information Systems and Technology

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments No Comments
Nov
19

The School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is hiring an open rank, tenure-track faculty position in information systems and technology, with an emphasis in areas such as human-computer interaction (HCI), database systems, mobile information applications, information security, networking, or multimedia.

Full position description, requirements, and application instructions are available here and pasted below.

(Note: we also have three other open faculty lines in health information services, health informatics or biomedical informatics; information organization; and archival studies.)

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

School of Information Studies

Information Studies Faculty Position

The School of Information Studies (SOIS), the iSchool at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), invites applications for a full-time open rank tenure-track position in Information Studies at the rank of Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor. The selected applicant will teach courses in the School’s undergraduate and, possibly, in the master’s program, MLIS, IT concentration.

Applicants should have a strong background in information systems and technology with an emphasis in areas such as human-computer interaction (HCI), database systems, mobile information applications, information security, networking, or multimedia. Professional experience is a plus.  The applicant should be willing to work closely with doctoral students and to serve on dissertation committees as well as willing to pursue extramural funding in support of her/his research program.

The School of Information Studies offers a competitive salary for an academic year (9 month) appointment, plus additional compensation for possible summer teaching, and generous fringe benefits. SOIS also provides extensive research support in the form of travel funding, research assistance, and internal research grant programs.

Required qualifications:

  • PhD in Information Studies or a relevant discipline by the beginning of the contract term.
  • Experience or demonstrated ability in research and teaching.

Preferred qualifications:

  • Experience or demonstrated ability in design and delivery of courses in a variety of formats, including onsite and online.
  • Demonstrated ability to teach in at least one of the required areas in the SOIS Bachelor of Science program in Information Science and Technology and advanced elective undergraduate or graduate courses in her/his areas of expertise.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Information Studies has a large diverse, international faculty that is among the top ten LIS programs in the United States for research productivity, a thriving Center for Information Policy Research, and interdisciplinary initiatives with numerous institutions in the United States and abroad.

Situated in the cultural, commercial, and educational hub of the state, in a pleasant residential neighborhood overlooking Lake Michigan, UWM is a research university committed to academic excellence.  It is one of the two doctoral degree-granting institutions in the multi-campus University of Wisconsin system, and has a student enrollment of over 29,000.

With more than 30 full-time faculty and teaching academic staff and more than 900 students, SOIS offers several educational programs: a Bachelor of Science in Information Science and Technology; an ALA-accredited MLIS; several coordinated graduate degree programs, including History and Anthropology; transcript-designated concentrations within the MLIS Archival Studies, Digital Libraries, Public Library Leadership, Information Organization, and Information Technology; post-masters Certificates of Advanced Study in Archives and Records Management and Digital Libraries;  and a PhD in Information Studies, with concentrations in information organization, information policy, and information retrieval.

SOIS hosts three research groups: the Research Group for Information Retrieval, Information Organization Research Group, and the Social Studies of Information Research Group.

The SOIS research and instructional programs are designed to be a resourceful blend of the University’s mission with the School’s information focus, international scope, and interdisciplinary mindset.

First priority will be given to applications received by December 17th, 2012. The starting date is August 19, 2013, or negotiable.

Please follow the below link to submit your cover letter, curriculum vitae;  teaching philosophy and research agenda; writing sample or recent publication, and three references to:

http://jobs.uwm.edu/postings/11448

For more information, please contact Dr. Maria Haigh, Chair of the Search and Screen Committee, at mhaigh@uwm.edu.

For questions regarding submission of your materials please contact Laura Meyer at Lauram@uwm.edu or (414)229-5409.

For more information about the School of Information Studies please visit the web site: http://www4.uwm.edu/sois/

UWM is an affirmative action, equal employment opportunity employer. For the UWM Crime Statistics Annual Report and the Campus Security Policy, see http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/OSL/CleryAct/, or call the Office of Student Life, Mellencamp Hall 118 at (414) 229-4632 for a paper copy.

UW-Milwaukee Seeking Fellow in the Social Studies of Information

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments No Comments
May
11

I’m pleased to announce that the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is accepting applications for a postdoctoral fellow in the social studies of information. We are targeting to select someone to join us in August 2012, so timing is tight. Application deadline is June 1. Details below, and feel free to email me with questions.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Social Studies of Information
School of Information Studies
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

The School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Social Studies of Information for the 2012-2013 academic year, to work closely with the School’s newly established Social Studies of Information Research Group (SSIRG).

The postdoctoral fellowship is designed for recent PhDs who are interested in research and pedagogy in the historical, social and cultural dimensions of information at its most fundamental levels, including information institutions, practices, industries, technologies, disciplines, users, policies, and ethics.

Along with continuing their own research agenda, the fellow will work closely with SSIRG-affiliated faculty, assist in coordination of SSIRG speaker series and related events, work with current PhD students, and participate in the academic and intellectual community of the School at large. Opportunities will exist for the fellow to collaborate with the Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR), Center for 21st Century Studies (C21) and other related campus centers and institutes.

The stipend for the fellowship will be $39,000 for a 12-month appointment beginning in August 20, 2012, with a $2,000 research and travel stipend. Fellows will be expected to teach one course each semester, with the opportunity to develop a course focused on their own research area. Fellows are eligible for benefits. The stipend for this position is subject to UW System policies.

Application Information:

  • Applicants must be scholars who are not yet tenured and who are no more than 3 years past receiving their PhD.
  • Applicants must hold a PhD in information studies or related discipline. Applicants who do not yet hold a PhD but expect to have it by August 2012 will be asked to provide a letter from their home institution corroborating the degree award schedule. Verification of completion of degree will be required before the start date.
  • Application packages must include: letter explaining research agenda and teaching interests; a 1-page statement of situating their personal research within the broader interdisciplinary contexts of the social studies of information; a curriculum vitae; a writing sample; and 3 references.
  • Deadline for application is June 1, 2012. Candidates selected for online interviews will be notified by June 15, 2012. Send all application materials via email to Dr. Michael Zimmer (zimmerm@uwm.edu).For more information, please contact Dr. Zimmer, and visit us at http://www4.uwm.edu/sois/.UWM is an AA/EEO Employer

On Drafting a Social Media Policy

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional, Social Media     Comments 2 Comments
Aug
25

Only a few days before the State of Missouri passed a law restricting private contact between students and teachers on social media, I was contact by UW-Milwaukee’s Department of Curriculum & Instruction to help social media guidelines for the student teachers it places in area schools.

The department’s motivation was largely to ensure professionalism in how its student teachers were acting on social media: not complaining about students on Facebook, Tweeting out funny things a kid said in class, or ranting about a co-worker in a blog post.

I haven’t tried to write such a policy previously, and wanted to carefully balance these important professionalization concerns with a student’s freedom of expression. To guide me, I looked over a variety of existing policies, and came up with the following as an initial draft.

Thoughts?  (I’m particularly concerned about my initial suggestion that students not create blogs to provide commentary on their experiences)

Professionalism, Student Teaching, and Social Media

This document presents social media use guidelines and recommendations suggested for all UWM student teachers. For the purposes of this document, social media means any facility for online publication and commentary, including without limitation blogs, wiki’s, discussion forums, and social networking sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+, Flickr, and YouTube. These guidelines complement – but do not replace – any existing policies regarding the use of technology, computers, e-mail and the Internet in place at UW-Milwaukee or the location of your student teaching placement.

As a student teacher, participation in social media and commenting in online media stories carries with it certain professional obligations. In your role as a student teacher, you represent UW-M with your placement institution. More importantly, you are an educator – a role model – for the students in your classroom. Your actions online should respect these professional obligations.

While all student teachers are welcome to participate in social media, we expect everyone who participates in online commentary to understand and to follow these simple but important guidelines. The goal of these guidelines is simple: to allow you to participate online in a respectful, relevant way that protects your reputation, the reputation of UW-M, respects the relationship between teachers and students, and of course follows the letter and spirit of the law.

Setting up Social Media

Social media identities, logon ID’s and user names should not reference your position as a student teacher or the school in which you are working. You should also not create blogs or social media sites for the specific purpose to provide commentary on your student teaching experience.

Don’t Tell Secrets

It’s perfectly acceptable to talk about your work and have a dialog with the community, but it’s not okay to publish confidential or sensitive information that might jeopardize the privacy of students or the overall educational environment. This includes information such as unpublished details about internal issues within a school or department, examples of student work or performance assessments, conversations had with students, conversations overheard within school, etc.

Respect your audience, your school, and your students

The public in general, and your school’s community and students, reflect a diverse set of people, values and points of view. Don’t be afraid to be yourself, but do so respectfully. This includes not only the obvious (no ethnic slurs, offensive comments, defamatory comments, personal insults, obscenity, etc.) but also proper consideration of privacy and of topics that may be considered objectionable or inflammatory – such as politics and religion. Use your best judgment and be sure to make it clear that the views and opinions expressed are yours alone and do not represent the official views of UW-M or your school.

Student Contact

It is best to not contact or interact with any students from your school through social media, such as Facebook posts/messages, Twitter, or instant messages. Official communication, when appropriate, could take place through official email. Student teachers should also refrain from “friending” or “following” any students from your school on social media.

 

Nadine Kozak joins UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies as 2011-2012 Postdoctoral Fellow in Information Policy

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments No Comments
Aug
3

As CIPR Co-Director, I’m very pleased to make this announcement:

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Information Studies (SOIS) and the Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR) is proud to welcome Dr. Nadine Kozak as the 2011-12 Postdoctoral Fellow in Information Policy. Dr. Kozak is an interdisciplinary scholar; she has a BA (Honors) in History from the University of Calgary, a MA in Communication from Carleton University, and a PhD in Communication and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego.

Dr. Kozak’s research explores government projects and public-private partnerships created with the intent to expand broadband services to unserved and underserved communities, and analyzes how these projects are adopted in rural areas by a variety of organizations and residents. Her dissertation research analyzed the development of broadband services in two regions, rural Wyoming and rural Alberta, Canada, using interview data, ethnographic data, government documents, and newspaper reports.

During her time at SOIS, Dr. Kozak will research projects carried out with federal Broadband Technology Opportunities Program funding. Her work will explore whether these projects achieve their goals of creating sustainable broadband adoption and compare these with older adoption programs in the U.S. and Canada. She plans to complete journal articles about advanced telecommunications and the results of deregulation. In addition to research and writing, while at SOIS, she would like to teach a class on the history of U.S. information policy, starting with the Post Office and culminating with the current state of telecommunications regulation.

While Nadine will greatly miss the Pacific Ocean and San Diego’s amazing beaches, she is excited to live in Milwaukee. During a brief visit to the city in June, she quickly began to appreciate Milwaukee’s age and heritage. Outside of work, Nadine would like to learn about, and enjoy, the region through food, museums, and festivals.

I’m also very happy to announce that Wilhelm Peekhaus, our 2010-2011 IP Postdoc Fellow, will be joining the SOIS faculty this fall.

Extending Search for Information Policy/Ethics Faculty Position at UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments No Comments
Jun
28

The School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is extending its search for a new faculty member (open rank) with a specialty in information policy & ethics:

The School of Information Studies (SOIS) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position in Information Studies at the rank of Assistant, Associate or Full Professor. The selected applicant will teach courses in the School’s graduate and, possibly, undergraduate programs. A PhD and MLIS (or comparable degree) are required as is demonstrated ability in research and teaching.

Applicants should have a strong background in information policy, including, but not limited to, ethical, cultural, technological or political issues as they relate to the information professions, systems, and infrastructures that make up our global information society.

Experience or demonstrated ability in design and delivery of courses in a variety of formats, including distance learning modes, is highly desirable. The Applicant should demonstrate the ability to teach in at least one of the core areas in the SOIS MLIS program and advanced graduate elective courses in her/his areas of expertise. Opportunities will also be available to teach in the School’s Bachelor of Science program in Information Science and Technology. The Applicant should be willing to work closely with doctoral students and to serve on dissertation committees. Experienced researcher a plus. Applicants who are eligible for a senior level appointment are especially encouraged to apply.

The preferred expected start date is January, 2012, and no later than August 2012.

For full details and to apply, visit the official posting here (position #2730).

Featured in UWM Research Report: "Limiting the danger of new technologies"

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments No Comments
Mar
23

Each year the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee issues a research report highlighting some of the innovative and influential research within our campus community. I feel privileged to be featured in the 2011 edition (PDF, page 34). Here’s an excerpt from my story:

Limiting the danger of new technologies

The Internet, the Web, search engines, social media and other communication/information technologies offer both new potential and new danger.

“We get information through search engines and we interact socially online,” says Michael Zimmer, assistant professor of information studies at UWM. “These tools are powerful, sexy and alluring, but we don’t always know what’s going on behind the scenes. We can’t get under the hood.” Zimmer has received national attention for his work in critically exploring and carefully explaining the ethical issues and privacy challenges posed by new communication tools.

A troubling consequence of new technology has been the rise in cyberbullying and violations of per- sonal privacy, says Zimmer. “It’s one thing to peek through a window and another to have a webcam transmitting what’s happening over the Internet.” Young people who have grown up with new media don’t always understand the power of the tools they’re using. “Students have expectations that only certain people will see something – only their 50 or so friends,” says Zimmer. They don’t consider that future employers, lawyers or a much wider audience around the globe might see that information, too.

Education is one way to offset the problems and harness the value of the technology. “It’s good to be out there,” he says, “but you need to have tools and skills to navigate this new world. You need to have the digital literacy to know how to use the Web safely and responsibly.”

UW-Milwaukee Seeking Postdoctoral Fellow in Information Policy (2011-2012)

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments 1 Comment
Mar
20

I’m pleased (again) to announce that the School of Information Studies and the Center for Information Policy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee are accepting applications for a postdoctoral fellow in information policy. We are targeting to select someone to join us in August 2011, so timing is tight. Application deadline is April 30. Details below, and feel free to email me with questions.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Information Policy
School of Information Studies
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

The School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Information Policy for the 2011-2012 academic year.

The information policy fellowship is designed for recent PhDs who are interested in social, ethical, economic, legal, and technical aspects of information and information technologies with a focus on information policy and information ethics. All applicable research areas are encouraged to apply, but preference will be given to applicants whose work investigates the intersections of information policy, intellectual property, intellectual freedom, governance, power, and identity.

Along with continuing their own research agenda, the fellow will work closely with the Center for Information Policy Research and affiliated faculty, assist in coordination of related events, work with current PhD students, and participate in the academic and intellectual community of the School. The fellow will be expected to teach one advanced graduate course related to her/his research topic in the spring 2012 semester. The stipend for the fellowship will be $38,000 for a 12-month appointment beginning in August 22, 2011, with a $2,000 research and travel stipend. Fellows are eligible for benefits. The stipend for this position may be subject to UW System furlough and budgetary policies.

Application Information:

  • Applicants must be scholars who are not yet tenured and who are no more than 3 years past receiving their PhD.
  • Applicants must hold a PhD in information studies or related discipline. Applicants who do not yet hold a PhD but expect to have it by August 2011 will be asked to provide a letter from their home institution corroborating the degree award schedule. Verification of completion of degree will be required before the start date.
  • Application packages must include: letter explaining research agenda, teaching interests, and appropriateness for the fellowship; a curriculum vitae; a writing sample; and 3 references.
  • Send all application materials electronically to both Dr. Joyce Latham (latham@uwm.edu) and Dr. Michael Zimmer (zimmerm@uwm.edu).
  • Deadline for application is April 30, 2011. Decisions to be made by May 31 2011.

For more information, please contact either Dr. Latham or Dr. Zimmer, and visit us at http://www4.uwm.edu/sois/ and http://www4.uwm.edu/cipr/.

Co-Director of Center for Information Policy Research

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments 1 Comment
Mar
18

I’m thrilled to announce (a bit late) that I have been appointed co-director of UW-Milwaukee’s Center for Information Policy Research (along with my colleague Dr. Joyce Latham).

(We are picking up the reins from our friend Dr. Elizabeth Buchanan, who is now the Endowed Chair and Director at the Center for Applied Ethics, University of Wisconsin-Stout.)

One of our first acts as directors was to update CIPR’s website and tweak (only slightly) its mission:

The Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR) is the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s multidisciplinary research center for the study of the intersections between the policy, ethical, political, social and legal aspects of the global information society. CIPR‘s research and scholarship focuses on such key information policy issues as intellectual property, privacy, intellectual freedom, access to information, censorship, cyberlaw, and the complex array of government, corporate, and global information practices and policies.

With information infrastructures and technologies and the globalization of information evolving at a faster pace than our social, legal, and educational systems, it is imperative that information policy issues be examined systematically in an interdisciplinary environment. Established in 1998 within the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee School of Information Studies (SOIS), CIPR facilitates information policy research through its research agenda, lecture series, consulting and outreach activities, and its various fellows programs.

CIPR welcomes formal and informal collaborations with other scholars, institutions and agencies interested in information ethics, law, or policy. CIPR personnel are available for consultations, advisement, presentations, and related educational and outreach opportunities.

Already this year, CIPR has partnered with UW-M’s Center for 21st Century Studies for the successful “Minding the Gaps: WikiLeaks and Internet Security in the 21st Century” symposium, which featured Laura DeNardis (Yale Information Society Project), and UWM faculty Sandra Braman (Communication) and Richard Grusin (C21, English). And, Joyce and I have represented CIPR at a discussion on “Intellectual Freedom vs. WikiLeaks” at the Brookfield Public Library.

For interested PhD students, we’ve organized an informal reading group on “Information & Power”, led by CIPR Faculty Fellow Sandra Braman.

Stay tuned for announcements of future events and appearances. Follow CIPR on Twitter, and find us on Facebook.

Collective Bargaining as a Human Right

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Professional     Comments 13 Comments
Feb
20

A slight diversion from the normal content of this blog, I’d like to take just a moment to highlight the protests here in Wisconsin against Gov. Scott Walker’s desire to eliminate most collective bargaining rights of most public employees. (Note: I am a state employee, but UW System faculty are not unionized).

The Governor’s so-called “Budget Repair Bill” will require state employees to make larger contributions to their pensions and health care coverage, and will also remove collective bargaining rights except for wages, which would be limited to be not greater than the Consumer Price Index. (Police and fire fighters would be exempt from this provision.)

While most public employees appear ready to make financial concessions to help ease the State’s budget crisis, the push to eliminate collective bargaining rights has not, to say the least, been well-received.

Wisconsin, of course, has a proud history of progressiveness and organized labor: Wisconsin was the first state to give its public workers the right to bargain collectively; the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees, the largest public employee and health care workers union in the United States, was founded here; and the state is often credited as the birthplace of progessivism. For such reasons, this dispute between a conservative state government and its public employees has been described as a defining moment in the labor movement nationwide.

We are 5 days into the organized protests, and it remains unclear if/when/how this will be resolved.

But I wanted to use this space to give credence to the argument that collective bargaining is a fundamental human right, recognized internationally in various conventions, constitutions, and courts.

For example, Article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights identifies the ability to organise trade unions as a fundamental human right, while item 2(a) of the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work defines the “freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining” as an essential right of all workers.

Consider the Bill of Rights of the South African Constitution, which guarantees that “Every trade union, employers’ organisation and employer has the right to engage in collective bargaining.”

In 2007, the Supreme Court of the State of Missouri held that Missouri’s state constitution also protected the right to collective bargaining for public employees.

And most strongly, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in a case disputing whether a constitutional guarantee of freedom of association includes procedural right to collective bargaining, finding that collective bargaining is indeed a human right:

The right to bargain collectively with an employer enhances the human dignity, liberty and autonomy of workers by giving them the opportunity to influence the establishment of workplace rules and thereby gain some control over a major aspect of their lives, namely their work… Collective bargaining is not simply an instrument for pursuing external ends…rather [it] is intrinsically valuable as an experience in self-government… Collective bargaining permits workers to achieve a form of workplace democracy and to ensure the rule of law in the workplace. Workers gain a voice to influence the establishment of rules that control a major aspect of their lives.

I do hope, in the coming days, the State of Wisconsin will also support dignity, liberty, and autonomy through the continuation of collective bargaining rights among public employees.

UDPATE: Please read this excellent post by UW-Madison’s Greg Downey: “On public employees and the right to organize

UPDATE 2: I found this letter from Archbishop Listecki [PDF] compelling, where he repeats the Catholic Church’s position that there is a moral imperative to protect workers rights, including collective bargaining. Listecki quotes section 25 of Pope Benedict XVI’s Caritas in Veritate (which itself builds from section 60 of Pope Leo XIII’s Rerum Novarum), which argues:

Through the combination of social and economic change, trade union organizations experience greater difficulty in carrying out their task of representing the interests of workers, partly because Governments, for reasons of economic utility, often limit the freedom or the negotiating capacity of labour unions. Hence traditional networks of solidarity have more and more obstacles to overcome. The repeated calls issued within the Church’s social doctrine, beginning with Rerum Novarum, for the promotion of workers’ associations that can defend their rights must therefore be honoured today even more than in the past, as a prompt and far-sighted response to the urgent need for new forms of cooperation at the international level, as well as the local level.

Listecki also quotes Pope John Paul II’s Laborem Exercens, which states “[a] union remains a constructive factor of social order and solidarity, and it is impossible to ignore it.” (#20, emphasis in original).

Two Open Information Policy Faculty Positions at UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies

Posted Posted by michaelzimmer in Information Law & Policy, Professional     Comments No Comments
Nov
4

The School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is hiring two open rank faculty positions in information policy.

The first position is looking for applicants with a strong background in one or more of the following areas: information policy, intellectual property, or legal/policy issues relevant to at least one of the following areas: information professions, digital libraries, management of information agencies, or information access.

The second position is focused on applicants with a strong background in information policy, including, but not limited to, ethical, cultural, technological or political issues as they relate to the information professions, systems, and infrastructures that make up our global information society.

Both positions will largely be focused on supporting our graduate programs, but opportunities to teach within the undergraduate program will be available. Applicants should be comfortable teaching a required course in our MLIS program, develop advanced graduate courses in their area of expertise, and be ready to support our (excellent) information policy PhD students. Both positions would likely result in close affiliation with the Center for Information Policy Research.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions about these positions, or SOIS generally. I also plan to be at ALISE 2011 in San Diego, in case anyone wants to sit down for an informal (and unofficial) chat. Deadline for priority consideration is December 10, 2010. See the official job postings (linked above) for more details.