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EFF Asks How Government Is Watching The Internet

It’s been reported that the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed a FOIA request with the FBI and other offices of the US DOJ regarding expanded powers granted by the USA PATRIOT Act. The EFF is making the request in an attempt to find out whether or not Section 216 is being used to monitor web […]

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Origins of Cyberspace auction

(via Nettime-L)Jeremy Norman, Northern Californian book dealer, has the world’s largest private collection of rare and one-of-a-kind manuscripts, essays, and ephemera relating to the birth of the Internet, from the earliest papers on difference engines to the first digital-computer patents. In February, Norman plans to offer the whole lot at Christie’s, in its first auction […]

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SphereXP

SphereXP is a 3D desktop anhancement for Microsoft Windows XP. In their words, it takes “the known concept of three-dimensional desktops to its own level. It offers a new way to organize objects on the desktop such as icons and applications.” Check the videos and screenshots to get the idea. [Servers seem to be down […]

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Is Google Watching Your Library Visits?

(via Google Weblog) Daniel Brandt at Google-Watch points out the possibility that Google’s personally identifiable cookie could enable the FBI or other government authorities to see what books you read using Google Library via a subpoena. His particular concern is the chilling affect on one’s ability to freely read “literature that has political content or […]

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More "friendly" search engines…

(via John Battelle’s Searchbog) Craig Silverstein, Google‘s technology officer, asks how your search engine can become more like your friend: It’s clear that a list of links, though very useful, doesn’t match the way people give information to each other,” says Mr Silverstein. The question that he says Google – like others – is now […]

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Submission to "Science and Technology in Society" Conference

I’ve made the following submission to the Science and Technology in Society conference sponsored by the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, The Center for International Science and Technology Policy at George Washington University, the Science and Technology Studies Program at Virginia Tech, and The American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS. […]

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iPod therefore iAm

Wired News writes about Prof. Markus Giesler’s ethnographic study of iPod users called “iPod Therefore iAm.” Giesler uncovers the formation of a new “cyborg consumer”: According to Giesler’s preliminary research, the iPod isn’t simply an updated Walkman. It’s an entirely new beast: a revolutionary device that transforms listeners into “cyborgs” through a process he calls […]

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No Place to Hide

(Via Privacy Digest) The New York Times reviews Robert O’Harrow’s new book No Place to Hide: Behind the Scenes of Our Emerging Surveillance Society: …Mr. O’Harrow provides in these pages an authoritative and vivid account of the emergence of a “security-industrial complex” and the far-reaching consequences for ordinary Americans, who must cope not only with […]

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Seeking Better Web Searches

Scientific American is seeking better Web searches. They report on all sorts of innovations happening outside the Google-Yahoo-MSN zone that the press is usually reporting on, including GPS-enhanced searches from University of Maryland, Shape Retrieval and Analysis from Princeton, musical search engine from New Zealand Digital Library Project, and some of the projects that A9 […]

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Tool for Thought

Steven Johnson writes a fascinating essay in the NY Times Sunday Book Review on the tool he uses for organizing and collecting thoughts – a wonderful example of an innovative information interface. Consider how I used the tool in writing my last book, which revolved around the latest developments in brain science. I would write […]

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