New Attention to Locational Privacy Threats

Recently, the EFF released a report named “On Locational Privacy, and How to Avoid Losing it Forever“, introducing some of the basic threats to locational privacy: Over the next decade, systems which create and store digital records of people’s movements through public space will be woven inextricably into the fabric of everyday life. We are already starting to see such systems now, and there will be many more in the...

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Privacy and Surveillance in Web 2.0: Unintended Consequences and the Rise of “Netaveillance”

[This thought piece appears on the On The Identity Trail project's blog, blog*on*nymity. Thanks to the amazing folks there for the (second) invitation to contribute to the project. -mz] This post is an attempt to collect and organize some thoughts on how the rise of so-called Web 2.0 technologies bear on privacy and surveillance studies. After presenting a few examples of unintended consequences of Web 2.0 that bear on privacy and...

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Another Court Ruling on GPS Tracking without Warrant

Two years ago I blogged about a very chilling precedent from an upstate New York federal judge who ruled that police can secretly attach Global Positioning System (GPS) devices to a suspect’s vehicle without a warrant, stating that suspects had “no expectation of privacy in the whereabouts of his vehicle on a public roadway.” Seems another federal judge agrees, expanding this dangerous precedent. The 7th Circuit of the U.S. Court of...

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TrackStick: Amateur Surveillance
Jan23

TrackStick: Amateur Surveillance

I just received a (spam) e-mail asking me if I’m interested in becoming a reseller of the TrackStick or TrackStick Pro. Um, no. TrackStick is a GPS tracking device featuring software integrated with Google Maps to enable tracking of oneself (I suppose) and amateur surveillance of others (more likely). The device records its location, time, date, speed, heading and altitude at preset intervals. With over 1Mb of memory, they claim...

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NYT on Cellphone Surveillance

The NY Times has a feature today on the prevalence of GPS-enabled cell phones for the surveillance of one’s kids. (Boost Mobile [page has audio] has also been pitching their GPS tracking features to adults so you can “know where your friends are at.”) Unfortunately I’m much too busy writing the diss to provide any nuanced reaction (I’ll link to related posts below the jump). Suffice it to say that the...

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