Tag Archives: Intellectual Privacy

New Publications on Privacy and Library 2.0

I’m pleased to announce two recent publications of my work exploring the implications of Library 2.0 platforms and applications for patron privacy. These represent early thinking on this complex relationship between privacy and web-based delivery of library services, and I intend to continue investigating this through a multidisciplinary assessment of the motivations, design, deployment, and impact […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Chronicle: “As Libraries Go Digital, Sharing of Data Is at Odds With Tradition of Privacy”

The Chronicle of Higher Education has published an excellent article by Marc Parry on “As Libraries Go Digital, Sharing of Data Is at Odds With Tradition of Privacy,” noting that as libraries are beginning to collect and share patron data to build tools for recommending and discovering books, important concerns over patron privacy emerge, which […]

6 Comments Continue Reading →

New Survey Confirms Librarians’ Commitment to Protecting Privacy Rights

In celebration of Choose Privacy Week, the American Library Association‘s Office for Intellectual Freedom has released preliminary findings from a new survey on “Librarian Attitudes and Behaviors Regarding Informational Privacy” that I conducted on their behalf with generous support from the Open Society Foundation. The press release with preliminary results is copied below; the full report […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

iConference 2012: The ethical (re)design of the Google Books project

I’m currently in Toronto, Canada for iConference 2012, presented by the iSchools organization, a worldwide collective of 33 Information Schools. The theme of the conference is “Culture-Design-Society”, and I will be presenting a paper titled “The ethical (re)design of the Google Books project”. The paper is available in the ACM digital library; the abstract and […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Librarians: Please contribute to a new survey about librarians and privacy

With generous support from the Open Society Foundation, I’ve been working with the American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom to help assess privacy attitudes and practices of librarians and related information professionals, and we just launched our first survey for librarians.

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

ALA Choose Privacy Week Webinar: Youth Privacy Attitudes

In preparation for Choose Privacy Week,  the American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom and American Libraries magazine hosted a webinar today, featuring the following panel of contributors: Angela Maycock, assistant director, ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone, deputy director, ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom Michael Zimmer, PhD, assistant professor, School of Information Studies […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Event: Emerging Privacy and Ethical Challenges for Libraries in the 2.0 Era

From May 2 through May 8, 2010, libraries across the nation will celebrate Choose Privacy Week for the first time. This American Library Association campaign invites library professionals, users, and friends into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age. The UWM School of Information Studies and UWM Libraries have joined together to […]

5 Comments Continue Reading →

Google Book Search Privacy Policy Mirrors Web Search, with One Hopeful, albeit Limited, Difference

The proposed Google Book Search Settlement Agreement has been the target of numerous criticisms, not the least of which has been its incredible impact on — and incredible silence about — users’ intellectual privacy. After pressure by the FTC and advocacy groups, Google published a Privacy Policy for Google Books. In announcing the publication of this privacy policy, Google notes that “Google Books has always been covered by the general Privacy Policy for all of Google’s services”. Unfortunately, the fact that Google repeats that Google Books will follow the same privacy policy of general Web searching means the norms of data collection of the Web will likely prevail over the norms of the library. All the reasons we are concerned about the privacy of our Web searches are now amplified with the possible emergence of a large-scale infrastructure to track and monitor book searches.

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Thoughts on Privacy and the Google Book Settlement

I shared my thoughts on privacy and the Google Book Settlement at the “Google Books Settlement and the Future of Information Access” conference organized by the UC-Berkeley School of Information. My remarks focused on my desire to trust Google when they say they’re “thinking hard” about these issues and promise to “protect readers’ privacy rights”, while noting their track record is reason enough to cause us some pause, which is why we’re pushing so hard as advocates on these vital concerns.

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Google Book Search Settlement and Reader Privacy: Questions & Answers

As the possible approval of the Google Book Search Settlement Agreement looms, various advocacy groups have brought attention to the fact that Google might gain even greater ability to monitor the books you browse, the pages you read, and even the highlights and marginal notes you make on digital copies of books.

Leave a comment Continue Reading →
 Byg nyt hus . http://betterparts.org/ . Judi Bola Online . lån på dagen