Tag Archives: RFID

New Attention to Locational Privacy Threats

Recently, the EFF released a report named “On Locational Privacy, and How to Avoid Losing it Forever“, introducing some of the basic threats to locational privacy: Over the next decade, systems which create and store digital records of people’s movements through public space will be woven inextricably into the fabric of everyday life. We are […]

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Local Library uses RFID to Manage Materials, but Privacy Concerns Abound

Continuing the theme of privacy issues related to my new home library system (and I still haven’t received any reply from the Shorewood Public Library regarding their collection of patron social security numbers), the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the West Allis Public Library is using RFID chips to help manage their collection. By including […]

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RFID in Libraries

Inspired by a presentation by Olivia Nellums at the Identity & Identification in a Networked World symposium, one of my post-dissertation research projects will be on the privacy issues related to increased use of RFID tags in libraries. Luckily, Don Wood just posted links to some key readings to help kickstart the literature review. Thanks, […]

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Nike + iPod = Surveillance

Another example of the need for value-conscious design: Wired News summarizes a damning report from four University of Washington researchers that reveals how security flaws in the new RFID-powered Nike + iPod Sport Kit make it easy for tech-savvy stalkers, spouses, thieves, corporations, or governments (oh my!) to track your movements via those nifty shoes. […]

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Privacy Pitfalls in No-Swipe Credit Cards

A NYTimes article notes the various privacy concerns with contactless credit cards whose data is relayed by RFID without need of a signature or physical swiping through a machine. Incredibly, cards are being deployed without any encryption (contrary to what the banks are saying): The card companies have implied through their marketing that the data […]

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Fly the Panoptic Skies

A Hungarian airport will soon test an RFID passenger tracking system (story here and here). The system can track every passenger to within one meter, and it will contain countermeasures to prevent passengers from removing or trading their RFID-tags. The claim is that by knowing the position of every person in an airport, crime and […]

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No, young shoppers do not want to pay with chip in skin

One of my pet peeves is the misuse of statistics in reporting. Here’s an example that happens to intersect with issues of privacy. The Daily Mail is featuring a story titled “Young shoppers want to pay with chip in skin”, extolling the fact that teenagers are willing to have microchip implants as a means of […]

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CFP: Identity and Identification in a Networked World Graduate Student Symposium

[I am one of the organizers the following graduate student symposium to be held this fall at NYU] CALL FOR PAPERS Identity and Identification in a Networked World: A Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Symposium When: September 29-30, 2006 Where: New York University Submission deadline: July 5, 2006 Increasingly, who we are is represented by key bits […]

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RFID Guidelines Released

The New York Times reports on a draft of RFID best-practices guidelines that are to be released today: Among other things, the guidelines say that consumers should be notified when goods have radio tags, which can be invisibly buried in labels, packaging or the goods themselves. The guidelines also say that it should be clear […]

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Public Comments on RFID Passports are…Public

The government’s plans to institute passports with RFID chips were open for public comment since last February. The public feedback was overwhelmingly negative, noting concerns over both security and privacy. In an odd bit of irony, most of the public comment was posted in entirety on the State Department’s website — including name, email address, […]

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