Microsoft to Delete IP Addresses From Bing Search Logs after 6 months
Jan19

Microsoft to Delete IP Addresses From Bing Search Logs after 6 months

Microsoft has fired a new salvo into the search privacy wars, announcing it will delete IP addresses from the Bing search engine logs after 6 months. Recall that in early 2007, Google announced it would “anonymize” its user search logs after 18-24 months. Later that year, Google reluctantly decided to add an expiration date to its web cookie, while Ask.com (unsuccessfully) tried to gain market share by giving users almost complete...

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More on Cuil's Non-Privacy Policy

Yesterday I posted that Cuil, the supposed “Google-killer” search engine that once took pride in not keeping any logs of its users’ activities, had dramatically altered its privacy policy, effectively stripping it of the strong privacy-protecting language it originally contained. Since then, I’ve received 3 communications from Cuil. The first was a tweet promising an email (not yet received) as well as the...

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Cuil's Famous Privacy Policy No Longer Protects Privacy

Remember Cuil, the search engine launched in 2008 that was supposed to be a Google-killer? Didn’t think so. Anyway, one of Cuil’s touted competitive advantages was that it didn’t track user search queries. Its original privacy policy (dated July 27, 2008) went to great lengths to make users feel comfortable about the privacy of their search activities, opening with this impressive declaration: Privacy is a hot topic...

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Google Dashboard: Convenient? Yes. Transparency, Choice and Control? Not so much.

For quite some time now, I’ve been writing about how “search” has become the center of gravity of our informational ecosystem, and that a primary externality of our dependence on search has been the threat to privacy. On numerous occasions I’ve called on Google to engage in value-conscious design in order to protect user privacy, and specifically argued for the creation of a Google Data Privacy center where...

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I Love Alaska: Amazing Film Inspired by AOL Search Data Release

Some filmmakers have produced an amazing series of episodes based on one person’s searches discovered in the AOL search data release debacle. Here’s the trailer: And the description from the website where you can view them all: August 4, 2006, the personal search queries of 650,000 AOL (America Online) users accidentally ended up on the Internet, for all to see. These search queries were entered in AOL’s search...

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